We make and sell natural products, including magnesium lotion, herbal salves, lotion bars, herbal bath salts and we’ll soon be adding spice mixes and teas! Justyn at Real Traditions and Creative Christian Mama (A note from Shannon: The magnesium lotion is the first “natural deodorant” I’ve used that actually works! Plus, it helps me (and my kids) fall asleep when we’re having a restless night. It rocks!)


This is one (interesting!) gig I couldn’t NOT mention. Ever heard of Yardi Matrix? They’re a company that works with real estate agents to do market research, property research, and more. What’s important for you to know is that three times a year (for 6-week spans) they hire at-home workers to make phone calls to do rent surveys. It’s a phone job, but they invite people with background noise because it makes you seem like a “real person.” Your role is to ask questions about rental properties, posing like you’re interested in renting them. It’s almost like mystery shopping, but you can do it from home. Learn more and apply here.


The fact is, cloth diapers do require more work than simply tossing a disposable into the trash, and they aren't the right choice for every family. But thanks to progress in modern tush-covering technology, they may make more sense for yours than you realize. Read our modern mom's primer for cloth diapering—you might just be inspired to give an old-fashioned choice a new look.
"I stuff the inserts into my pocket diapers right out of the dryer so they're ready to go, just like disposables," says Ellen Kucera of Warren, Vermont, mom of 2-year-old Tarin and 11-month-old Eli. "They're easy enough that babysitters, daycare, and grandparents don't need an in-depth tutorial." Both AIOs and pocket diapers start at around $18 apiece. Popular brands include bumGenius, Kawaii, and FuzziBunz. 
One other recommendation I can give is to get in touch with your city counsellor, MPP and MP for where you live. You can do it by email, but it would be better if you could visit their constituency office in person (MPP & MP). By the very nature of their job they have to schmooze and meet with businesses and people in the riding in order to win their votes some election time. Let them know that you are a struggling parent and student who really needs a job that is not after 5 and no weekends and if they know of any businesses hiring or if they can recommend where to go. I say this because that's exactly what I did when I desperately needed employment when I was a single mom and my daughter was in school. I contacted my MP and they just happened to have a job opening in the office and the pay was great and the hours were perfect. You just never know. As they say, the squeaky wheel gets the grease, so don't be afraid to get squeaky ;-)
I opted to go with pocket-style diapers. (There are 243,793,450,138 different styles and options and I won’t lie, I got so confused by all the lingo on the cloth diapering sites that I gave up and emailed bloggers who use cloth for recommendations.) Pocket-style cloth diapers really resemble disposables — there’s a cute outer shell/pant thing that you stuff uber-absorbent inserts into. They fasten with snaps or velcro or snaps AND velcro and are crazy adjustable — you’ll notice the weight limits tend to run from 15 to 35 pounds or so. (To give you an idea of that range: Ezra weighed 15 pounds by four months, while Noah currently weighs around 33 pounds at three-and-a-half. So they wear the same size. Glorious.) (Noah, despite being on the high end of the weight range, is so skinny that he still isn’t on the loosest snap setting on a medium Fuzzi Bunz, that technically says it’s for 15-30 pounds.)
If you do the math and realize that staying home, even if you would be receiving a bit less is still the best option for you, there are some important things you can begin to do while your children are at home with you in those first 5-6 years. Consider welfare or social assistance a helping hand, a stepping stone to get you to the next step of your life once the kids are starting school full time.
Madowitz told Working Mother that he came up with the calculator when he and his wife became parents. His wife is a mathematician, and they were trying to decide if he should stay home to care for the kids or if they should pay for childcare. When discussing the situation with other friends in the same boat, he realized their numbers didn’t match up. “We were talking about our decision in this long-term framework, and a lot of other people were talking about it in terms of, ‘I bring home X, and childcare costs Y,” he explains. He argues that this is too simple a way of looking at the situation. When you’re not working, you’re not just missing out on your wages, you’re also missing out on the chance to earn raises and retirement plan contributions. Over time these extras add up.
This didn’t surprise me at all. A full-time job is just that, full-time. Being a stay-at-home mom is also a full-time, around the clock job. Just because you have the option to do both things from the same place doesn’t magically help you create more hours in the day. I don’t know if I could handle always feeling like I’m failing on one side of things or the other.
P.S. If you want to learn from some of the best in the business I highly recommend you check out the Work at home Summit. This summit is a collection of entrepreneurs talking about a myriad of different work at home businesses and jobs they’ve started and grown. This is 100% the best work at home event I’ve ever seen. (Totally scam free.) And it’s free. You can find out more here.
Hi , thanks for the tipsI never thought to use a number of those Jobs. I find that the best way for me is to complete surveys. I have been doing this for about a year now for about an hour each day and i’m making about $350-$500 each month, which isn’t bad considering it’s just meant to be some additional income. I find that this site works the best for those of you that are interested paymentforsurveys.blogspot.com
You could also borrow from friends, try consignment stores or online diaper-swap sites, or visit the Facebook and Twitter pages of various brands, as companies sometimes issue calls for testers. Or join a trial program, like Diaper Lab's $35, two-week "Experiment to Own" option, which is basically like leasing a car, only with nappies instead of a Nissan. Jillian's Drawers is another option. In the end, it all comes down to your (and your baby's) personal preference.
You can totally do this. We didn't start right away honestly just because I didn't originally consider cloth diapering but we've been using cloth since dd was 3 months old and she's close to 6 months now. I also work 32 hours but with lunch and my commute I'm away from home during work week 44 hours. I also bf so am dealing with that as well. I honestly think washing the diapers is way easier than washing and drying bottles to use while I'm gone. Plus cloth diapers are a ton of fun.
Flexible spending (dependent-care) accounts offered by many employers allow employees to set aside up to $5,000 of income before taxes annually to pay for child care. Higher-bracket couples can save up to $150 monthly in federal/local income tax, and FICA deductions versus paying with after-tax funds. Even without such accounts, the federal child-care credit can save (per child, up to two children) higher-income families about $50 per month and lower-income families up to $1,050 annually. Note: You can choose only one of these two methods each year. (To find out more, see Money Saving Year-End Tax Tips and How can I use a child tax credit?)
Working full-time at home isn’t for the faint of heart. It requires focus, discipline, motivation, and an ability to fight through the day-to-day isolation. It takes a certain personality to love it and thrive at it. But of the work-at-home warriors out there, there is a select group of which I am constantly in awe. Work-at-home moms who are also caring for young children full time. These are the parents who are genuinely trying to “have it all,” all at once, difficulties or not.

This is a post I’ve been wanting to write for a long time! In a way it’s a follow up to my post on How to Afford to Be a Stay at Home Mom article. And in a way it is at the crux of everything I write about here at Affording Motherhood. In that article, I noted how the average mother only needs to make up $700 per month in order to afford to be a stay at home mom, after taking out all the costs of going to work. 

I started my little photography blog 5 years ago while I was a law student.  I could never have dreamed it would become a full-time job (yes, I did become a lawyer but I started earning far more from my blog than I could have as an attorney, so I don’t practice law anymore).  I recorded a 35-minute audio podcast with my wife about how exactly we got started that you can listen to here.  I’ve gotten tons of emails from readers who have told me they really appreciated that episode.
If you have word skills, if you cringe when you see a misspelled word, if you're an avid reader, then a freelance proofreading home business might be perfect for you! General proofreading is a home business with unlimited potential! As the Internet grows, more and more website, ebook, newsletter, and ad publishers need someone to proofread their copy. The … Read More
When you eat while distracted, you’re missing out on huge pieces of the experience of eating. You’re not paying attention to where you are. You’re not paying a...ttention to who you’re with and, most importantly for those of us who battle over eating, you’re not paying attention to the food that’s going into your mouth or your inner hunger and satisfaction cues.
One-Size. Believe it or not, there are "one-size" diapers that grow with your baby, "so you can potentially use the exact same diaper on your eight-pound newborn as you will when she is ready to potty train," Odom says. Snap or Velcro closures let you adjust for size, and progressively larger inserts accommodate changing absorbency needs. (A poplar one-size diaper: bumGenius One-size Cloth Diapers, which include a miniature insert for newborns and a larger insert for growing babies.)
I love my BG one size diapers. I have a mix but I go back to those a lot. The other nice thing about them is that they are a trim fit unlike a lot of other cloth diapers. With most of my other diapers I have to size up 3-6 months in bottoms because of the wonderful big booty they create – so cute! – but the BGs are close to a disposable diaper in size/fit. If we have a third child I’ll be buying a few more of the BGs.
Very interesting perspective and yes a bit jealous coming from the US and from the non paid mat leave working world. However at some level either you and/or other taxpayers are paying for your leave. You’ve either paid this in your withholdings in your check already and/or other workers have paid into this program. This is similar to what some US states have in america for women on mat leave, they pay into this state run program. As a working mother with unpaid leave, I think these sort of programs are wonderful. However, on the flip side, I don’t think I would want to have a job, leave for a year and then go back to work. That’s an enormous amount of time off to then head back into the working world. Regardless if that’s the law, I can’t imagine that’s an easy process for the woman on mat leave and the employer/co-workers. It was an adjustment coming back to work after 12 weeks, I could not imagine what sort of environment you would walk into after 52 weeks. I would really like to know the stats on how many woman actually come back after the one year mark or just collect their benefits of this one year paid leave and then never set foot back into work. Is there a caveat on getting the benefits if you don’t go back?
Depending on which state a young parent lives in, that ratio of income-to-child-care costs is often even worse, the CAP study found. Take Massachusetts, for example. Women between the ages of 21 and 31 in that state have higher median incomes—$38,320 per year—when compared to their compatriots nationally. But the cost of putting two kids in a child care center in Massachusetts runs an average of $29,843 per year, according to 2015 data from the non-profit Child Care Aware of America. That’s a solid 78% of a young Massachusetts woman’s median salary.
One of the things you often hear from people who work-at-home full-time is the difficulty in finding balance. When your home becomes your office, you no longer have a clear line of separation so you never feel like you can truly shut your work down. From talking to these work-at-home, stay-at-home moms, I can only gather that this situation gets even harder when you add childcare, a third type of work, to your balancing act.
Work-from-home jobs come in all varieties, and not all of them are legit. So my first tip for work-from-home parents is: Beware of scams! If something sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Be wary of any job that requires you to part with cash up-front, as well as anything that "promises" or "guarantees" overnight riches yet doesn't have a set pay rate. If you're considering a position but suspect it might be a scam, check with the Better Business Bureau or the Trade Commission. 

After a little bit of trial and error, my husband and I decided we liked the BumGenius one-size pocket diapers with aplix the best.  These are the only diapers we send to daycare because they operate just like a disposable.  At the day care center there can be several different people changing a diaper so we wanted to make it as easy as possible on them.


Neiman Marcus is hiring work at home customer service in Texas. These are part-time, seasonal work at home positions. You must have your own PC, reliable high-speed Internet, and Windows 7 or higher. From the company: "The Seasonal Customer Care Phone Associate provides exceptional service and sales support to customers shopping through our catalog and … Read More

As the sole breadwinner for my family, I love Bethany’s comment on taking some of the pressure off her husband! My husband and I made the decision for him to stay home together, and I adore the special bond he has with our son and the parental attention our son gets on a regular basis, but that doesn’t mean being a single wage earner isn’t its own kind of pressure. If living on a single income makes money tight for your family, working at home even part-time may help ease the burden.
While I still would rather not work outside the home, I can see the benefits of my job. Beyond my salary and benefits (the benefits where I work are VERY good), I have provided a lot of stability for our family. DH has had a turbulent career, including six months of unemployment and working for years in an unstable job with threats of layoffs and a paycut. In addition, from age six months until kindergarten (and the summer after kindergarten) we were blessed with a daycare situation that provided a sort of “second family” for our child. We can no longer use the family because they moved, but we keep in touch. I’m unconvinced that daycare cannot, in fact, be beneficial to a child if you find the right situation.
For this article, I interviewed eight work-at-home moms who have worked full-time at home with kids ranging from newborn age to six. One mom has kids ranging from one to fourteen, but we focused on handling the younger years. In addition to working at home full-time, these ladies were also the primary caregivers to their kids. Some used part-time daycare or a babysitter a few hours a week to stay sane, but the majority of the time they are juggling their children and their jobs simultaneously. Hats off to them!
Give yourself a break: Even the most ardent of cloth diaper users find that there are several circumstances when they switch to disposables.  Traveling can be a real hassle with heavy, wet, soiled cloth diapers.  And there will be some babysitters or other caretakers who are less keen on the idea of the cloth diapers. So, go ahead and take the weekend away or the date night: it’s more important that you take good care of yourself (so you can be a better parent) than that you have a perfect cloth diapering record!
This is a post I’ve been wanting to write for a long time! In a way it’s a follow up to my post on How to Afford to Be a Stay at Home Mom article. And in a way it is at the crux of everything I write about here at Affording Motherhood. In that article, I noted how the average mother only needs to make up $700 per month in order to afford to be a stay at home mom, after taking out all the costs of going to work.
Origami Owl is a direct selling company that provides individuals with customizable lockets. The company currently has over 60,000 Independent Designers across the United States, Puerto Rice and most recently Canada. Independent Designers sell Origami Owl through several means, including at-home parties called Jewelry Bars. Each Designer is an independent business owner and has their individual Origami Owl branded web page for customers to purchase items through.
Swagbucks is for SAHMs that love to shop. In fact, it’s one of the most fun jobs for stay at home moms. Members earn points for every item purchased on over 1500 online shopping platforms, including Amazon. Rather than spending money, you can also earn points for taking surveys, watching videos, trying out various services, searching the Internet, and playing games. There’s even a mobile app so you can keep earning during your next parent-teacher conference.
Stay at home, homeschooling mom of 4. My husband does a great job of supporting our family but I’ve become an independent distributor for 2 or 3 companies that we just love their products! My favorite for a home business would probably be Lilla Rose since the products are something almost any woman/girl can use and the company support is so great. – Tyra Whitlow at Lilla Rose
I also have the never-ending piles of laundry, the shelves that always need dusting, the dishes that just keep on getting dirty, and so on. Of course, these are things all families deal with, but when you work at home, those things tug at you all day. I’m part of the mess and contributing to it, while at the same time being driven crazy by it. Since work and kids take priority, the house gets put on the back burner — and then sometimes it gets forgotten and boils over and sets off the fire alarm. *sigh*

A lot of us work full time. CDs really aren't that time consuming. I do 3 CD loads a week - Sunday evening, Tuesday evening, and Thursday evening. I throw them in the wash when DH starts DS's bath around 7:30 PM, then they are done around 9:00 PM so I put the inserts in the dryer for 50 min and hang the pockets to dry. Inserts stay dry in the dryer until DH starts bath the next night and I do my stuffing then (takes about 10 min) and then join the 2nd half of bath time.
Oh this is such great information! I work from home 90% of the time, and we homeschool our kids. My husband is a SAHD which makes it (a lot) more manageable, but still… it’s tough, because it feels like I’m always at work and also never getting a chance to work! The “Grass is always greener” part is SO true. I try to find a little balance by going to work at a coffee shop or something once in a while, just for a change of scenery; I get that most people don’t have a stay-at-home partner to afford them this luxury!
I Will Teach You To Be Rich, a personal finance brand with a New York Times bestselling book and one million readers, is seeking a home-based personal and business finance editor in the U.S. This position is 100% remote. This work at home role is full-time. From the company: "You’ll be responsible for recruiting top writing talent to make I Will Teach You … Read More
I have always wanted to be a SAHM and my husband and I are working to save up as much as possible to make that transition easier, when we do eventually have kids. I do not have a “career” with advancement potential, I have a job, and not one I’d cry over if I didn’t have it any more LOL I’m aware that I’m relying on my husband to not only support us now, but down the road and into our presumed ‘rest of our life together.’ That’s a risk I’m willing to take. I feel strongly that, at least in the early years, it’s preferable that A parent stay home with the kids. It’s a shame more businesses aren’t willing to work with that parent to be flexible on hours, etc. I agree with other commenters, you really can’t have it all, and if your career is THAT important to you, don’t have kids until you’re willing to give it up (or, have kids early and get them in school so you can focus more on your career). Some women are happier working outside the home; I would not be one of those. It’s a decision each family is going to have to think long and hard about!
Hi ladies im a stay at home mother also mother to two boys and one girl just starting school this year :) i do marketing i work with Wake Up Now! Incredible buisness the training by my knowledgeable leaders has really rubbed off! This blog is grear its amazing how many creative way mother have created to be able to stay home and raise there children. If anyone is ever interested find me on facebook Jackelyn Barbour or my direct site is mrsbarbour08.wakeupnow.com email me at [email protected]. Have a wonderful day ladies stay blessed!
There are many different ways to stuff pockets. Most come with 1-2 microfiber inserts, and these may work just fine for you. One small microfiber insert is usually all that a newborn needs. As babies grow and some become heavy wetters, you may want to add a different type of insert that is more absorbant. You can choose from charcoal, hemp, Zorb, and bamboo. I have heavy wetters, and I opt for stuffing my pockets with two inserts: a microfiber on top closest to the inner and closest to the baby to absorb the wetness, then a hemp insert under that closest to the PUL to help lock in wetness. This also keeps diapers trim since hemp is often thinner yet denser than microfiber. See pic 3 for examples of types of inserts (also called soakers and boosters). See pics 4-6 for adding a booster and stuffing a pocket.
The Canadian health care system is far from perfect and I often complain about it, but the truth is that any other alternative would surely be a lot more expensive for us. As parents we have already taken advantage of our health care system many, many times. Shall I start with our fertility issues and subsequent treatment, or the specialist doctor visits for each of my pregnancies, or the three C-sections and subsequent hospital stays? Later on I also stayed at the Children’s Hospital for five days with our newborn son, as he slept utterly adorable in sunglasses under jaundice-fighting blue lights. We regularly visited physiotherapists at the Children’s Hospital with our other two daughters, we often see our pediatrician, and we have accessed other services.

My husband and I have been thinking about this issue in terms of future possible children and are facing the difficult issue of health insurance. Health insurance is through my low paying job, while my husband’s high paying job does not offer a group plan, therefore, we are stuck between losing health insurance or having our children in daycare full time. (We can’t live off my income alone, though could off of his.) We feel caught between a rock and a hard place in thoughts of having children and the issue of daycare (we’d prefer to have me stay at home with the kids) and health insurance.


Zeitcaster is a location-based service that delivers local event data. They frequently hire part-time data entry clerks to input time and location data, as well as categorize each event. Data Entry clerks are assigned to different types of events based on employee interest, for example: Art, Children & Family, Nature & Outdoors, etc. Pay is around $15/hour, likely dependent on location.
I worked as a nurse for 10 years but had to quit to stay home with my now 2 year old twins when they were 7 months old. My daughter had a seizure and it didn’t make sense to stay. I am glad there is a list like this. I stayed home and just spend time with my babies most of the last year and a half but recently in May started with Origami Owl as a way to have fun and spend time with other female adults. Later I joined Plexus just to get the discount myself and I have been doing amazing both in my wellness journey & making quite a bit of money off of it also. I am hoping to make it into a full time income before my kids go to kindergarten so when they go to school I don’t have to go back to work. I just don’t want to send them to daycare during the summers so unless I find a job as a school nurse I plan to stay home. Life is too short & they stay little for too short of a time to send them to daycare for someone else to raise them for me.
Writing eBooks is an excellent strategy for people who are skilled writers and feel like they could do enough research to learn what is necessary to write a book on some topic.  I wrote my first eBook about photography.  I wasn’t a pro, but I really liked photography and thought I could at least share what I’d learned so far.  It did so well that it is what motivated me to start a blog and work online.
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