According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor, approximately 21% of employees work from home on an average day. I’m sure a significant proportion of these people are mothers who are taking care of their children simultaneously. It can be hard to juggle so many responsibilities, but the key to making it work is finding a job with the perfect fit – one that has built-in flexibility, reasonable compensation and engages all of your greatest strengths.

How to Get It: Customer service is the biggest work-at-home field, with companies including Spiegel, Hilton, Best Western, HSN, 1-800-FLOWERS and many others using at-home reps. Fill out an application with staffing companies such as Arise, Alpine Access, VIPdesk, LiveOps, and Convergys, all of which vet the companies who are hiring through them. If you need benefits, search through a staffing company that will hire you as an employee (Alpine Access, VIPdesk and Convergys do this) rather than an independent contractor. If you're a contractor, you may be asked to pay a small fee (between $15 and $35) for a background check. While a fee can be a sign of a scam, independent contractors are responsible for their own expenses.
This article is FANTABULOUS!!! Thank you sooo much! It is very overwhelming trying to sort through what may or may not be a scam on-line. This is the first time I have found information that seems promising. I am looking to be able to earn enough to support myself (I do not have kids) since health issues make it extremely difficult to work outside of my home. Keep up your great work!
Hmmmm I’m a work from home mom right now but there are a couple of these I’m going to try out! Why not make a few bucks while shopping and have the gas paid for? Or help someone out if I’m running around anyway? Plus we are a pet free home so the kids would love pet sitting once in a while. LOVE this list thanks mama!! =) hope some of these links work in Canada!!
The WAHM appears to be the mother of all corporate victories, one that touts the elusive “balance” between motherhood and career. The gender equality win we’ve been fighting for! Brava! Educated women get to have their babies and their jobs. Their minivans and their tenure tracks. Their 401Ks and their families. Their cakes. All the cakes! And eating them proudly with their paychecks.
You already spend way too much time pinning on Pinterest and posting fabulous pics on Instagram. Now get paid for your social-media savvy! The social-media evaluator will need to improve the relevancy of the newsfeed for a leading global social-media client. You’ll need to commit to working one to four flexible hours a day, five days per week. For some projects, at least one day must be a weekend day. Doing outstanding work will make you eligible for additional social-media projects. To qualify, you’ll have to perform online daily social-media use (i.e., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, etc.), have strong communication skills and a high-speed Internet connection. 
Stella & Dot – Run your own fashion social selling business. Stella & Dot is so much more than a fashion brand – we are inspired by, and created for, strong women just like you! We designed a smart, stylish business that works when you do. Plus, Stella & Dot is more than just a company – it's a community. At Stella & Dot, success is defined by your happiness. It’s your business, your pace, your way.
Another way to get affordable child care: Pool your resources with several other working moms and hire one babysitter to watch all your children at the same time. Even without the sitter, you can get together with other WAHMs and let the kids play while you all work. "I found that if a child has a playdate, he or she is often amused long enough to allow you to do work that doesn't require extreme quiet," says freelance writer Melissa Dutton, of Columbus, Ohio, who also sometimes swapped child care for her two kids with another working mom a few hours a week. "I knew that she worked from home, too, so I offered to take her kid first, and it grew from there." 

I did work for a while, and then I got married, but when our first baby came along, we couldn’t really afford for me not to work at all. So I started a small editing business from home, which allowed me to bring in a little cash and keep up my professional skills. After a while, I wanted more regular work, so I started doing online tutoring. I set my hours around my husband’s schedule, and it all worked well.
Laura recounts how, in going out with her girlfriends, many of whom were stay-at-home moms, she was in the unique position to hear the gripes of wives talking about their husbands not coming home at night on time — and realize that their complaints were the same as her own husband’s. “Since I was friends with SAHMs, I listened and learned a lot about their frustrations which turned out to be about the same as Ron’s,” she remembers.
Meanwhile, Mark and his wife are secure enough in their marriage and feel completely comfortable poking fun at themselves. He relates the story of when a fellow non-traditional couple came over for brunch one weekend. “It was probably funny and ironic enough for a fly on the wall to witness two dads talking about the travails of raising preschoolers while their wives talked about business,” says Mark. “But the real ‘aha’ moment came as they were about to leave. Carol and I both wished Diana well as she navigated the pregnancy and impending birth with her career, and jokingly warned Bill that he was about to have his hands full. ‘Don’t feel sorry for Bill,’ Diana joked, ‘He’s got total job security now.’ With that, she gave him a loving pat on the rear end. It was funny, and we laughed, but I couldn’t help think I’d just witnessed a scene from the 1950’s except in reverse.”
But there is one scenario that these numbers cannot possibly reflect — the number of moms who have successfully launched part-time businesses or side hustles out of their homes. Although there is no hard data on those numbers, more than 8.6 million U.S. businesses are owned by women. Undoubtedly, many of those businesses are run by mothers who manage their businesses’ affairs while also keeping an eye on the kids.
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