IRC is searching for Market Research Caller candidates who can work from their homes. Candidates are paid an hourly rate, $15.00/hour, as an independent contractor and can work full or part-time. Your pay is NOT commission-based or dependent on the number of results that are developed. Please note that this is a business-to-business telemarketing position using our cloud-based telesales system designed for virtual agents. The position will require cold-calling our targeted lists using your own WINDOWS-based computer, computer headset and high-speed internet access. After training, the days and number of hours you work are flexible although you must commit to at least of four hours per day during the 5-day working week. For more information about IRC, please visit us at: www.interactiveresearch.biz
Sorry, guys. But if you’re searching for a work-from-home job because you’re a parent and have grand visions of diligently cranking through your workday sitting in a comfortable home office while your toddler peacefully plays with blocks beside your desk, then you’re delusional. That’s a highly romanticized notion. Balancing even a part-time work-from-home job and the responsibilities of parenting is tricky. There are still bosses, meetings, and work that needs to be turned in. And instead of focusing exclusively on doing that work, you must squeeze it in between naps, washing bottles, or picking your child up for daycare. It can be incredibly stressful and you often end up working more hours than you would if you had just dragged yourself into an office.
I also have the never-ending piles of laundry, the shelves that always need dusting, the dishes that just keep on getting dirty, and so on. Of course, these are things all families deal with, but when you work at home, those things tug at you all day. I’m part of the mess and contributing to it, while at the same time being driven crazy by it. Since work and kids take priority, the house gets put on the back burner — and then sometimes it gets forgotten and boils over and sets off the fire alarm. *sigh*
One of the most significant social trends in the last 20 years has been the rise in the number of SAHDs. In the United States, this number has reached 1.9 million and accounts for 16% of the stay-at-home parent population, according to 2015 U.S. Census data. Our culture continues to shift away from the rigid gender roles of past generations, which is made evident by women expecting more involvement from dads — and dads stepping up to the challenge by willingly taking on the primary nurturing role in their children’s life.
Most work-at-home moms don't start out with a full-time telecommuting position right away. The work-at-home lifestyle is usually something you build over time. In fact, you may need to build up your savings first. Plan to start small. If you're moving from the office to telecommuting, maybe try just a couple days a week at first to see how it works for you and your employer. If you're building a business, that takes time.
But there is one scenario that these numbers cannot possibly reflect — the number of moms who have successfully launched part-time businesses or side hustles out of their homes. Although there is no hard data on those numbers, more than 8.6 million U.S. businesses are owned by women. Undoubtedly, many of those businesses are run by mothers who manage their businesses’ affairs while also keeping an eye on the kids.
But most people don’t know how to start a freelance career from scratch. Where do you find clients? Do you need a website? How do you file taxes? Working with an agency can be the perfect stepping stone to building your stay-at-home career as a freelancer. Companies like Upwork, Belay, CloudPeeps, and, yes, your pals here at Don’t Panic specialize in connecting virtual workers with businesses who need their services.

The fact of the matter is that it definitely makes sense to start a work-from-home job when you are a single dad and do not want anyone else to take care of your kids while you are out trying to earn some money. With some experience, you will be able to find a job good enough to make a living out of it. Just be wary of work-from-home scams and never pay any money upfront for promised future employment. Understand that you are offering your services, so you are the one who should get paid, and not the other way round.
Once you have great content, you can join one of several affiliate marketers. The concept here is to link from your blog to another website that sells something. For example, Amazon.com has a very robust affiliate program and if you read a book and write a review, you can link your review to Amazon and if you are an affiliate, you can earn money for clicks from your site and a commission when an item is sold. Two affiliate sites that are worth exploring are Commission Junction and LinkShare.
Fast-forward 15 years, and I’ve had at least seven work-from-home jobs, usually more than one at time. It’s been great for the most part. I do get the best of all worlds — getting to make my own schedule, being able to be with my kids during the day, keeping my foot in the door professionally, and contributing to the household income. I feel incredibly fortunate to have been able to find work I can do from home all these years.

If you have knowledge about certain subjects, consider sharing it with the world through blogging. You can event start a blog on parenting and tell people how it feels to be a single dad and how they can handle things better. Sharing gorgeous pictures of your babies can add a personal touch to your blog and make it work even better. Just set up a blog and market it on websites such as Pinterest, Craftgawker, or Foodgawker to earn money through it. 
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