In Ron’s case, he maintains that if he could do it all over again, he would still choose being a stay-at-home dad. “I have asked myself the same question,” confesses Laura. “And my answer is also that I would have chosen to work. Overall, I love working and having a career. I also don’t feel like I missed out on any of my children’s’ activities as they were growing up.”
Learning doesn’t only happen in a traditional classroom setting. Education is one of the most popular work-from-home jobs out there, allowing teachers and educators alike the opportunity to school students from anywhere in the country—and frankly, the world. For this full-time remote job, you’ll work one on one with students virtually offering math tutoring in geometry, trigonometry, precalculus, AP statistics, and so on via iPad and iPhone applications. You’ll need to have a bachelor’s degree and a current teaching license to apply for this position. 
In 2016, only 19 percent of men did housework — such as cleaning or doing laundry — compared to 49 percent of women, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Additionally, 68 percent of women did food preparation and/or cleanup compared to 42 percent of men. This doesn’t even include the invisible mental load and emotional labor women are bogged down with daily:  keeping track of doctor appointments, hiring out to fix things in the home, playdate schedules, family vacation planning, etc. 
Great list! I have been a stay at home Mom for going on 4 years now. It is absolutely a sacrifice, both emotionally and financially to do so. I started looking into ways I could supplement our income, since my husband gets paid monthly. I do before/after school care most days, then during my free time I float between Amazon mturk and Swagbucks. Neither will make you rich quick.
One of the most significant social trends in the last 20 years has been the rise in the number of SAHDs. In the United States, this number has reached 1.9 million and accounts for 16% of the stay-at-home parent population, according to 2015 U.S. Census data. Our culture continues to shift away from the rigid gender roles of past generations, which is made evident by women expecting more involvement from dads — and dads stepping up to the challenge by willingly taking on the primary nurturing role in their children’s life.
The couple also noticed that there was an obvious assumption from other parents that as the mother, Laura was the “default” parent. “Even though Ron stayed home, the moms would call me to schedule things — and I would relay information to Ron,” Laura says. “A few moms figured out after several years, that they could just call him directly. There are some things that only a mom can do (especially with girls), like shop for prom dresses or make-up, but that is true whether a mom is a SAHM or working mom.”

Meanwhile, Mark and his wife are secure enough in their marriage and feel completely comfortable poking fun at themselves. He relates the story of when a fellow non-traditional couple came over for brunch one weekend. “It was probably funny and ironic enough for a fly on the wall to witness two dads talking about the travails of raising preschoolers while their wives talked about business,” says Mark. “But the real ‘aha’ moment came as they were about to leave. Carol and I both wished Diana well as she navigated the pregnancy and impending birth with her career, and jokingly warned Bill that he was about to have his hands full. ‘Don’t feel sorry for Bill,’ Diana joked, ‘He’s got total job security now.’ With that, she gave him a loving pat on the rear end. It was funny, and we laughed, but I couldn’t help think I’d just witnessed a scene from the 1950’s except in reverse.”


Buza: The biggest problem with SAHDs is the isolation. The stay-at-home world is geared for women. All the kids’ groups are run by women. The Facebook groups are dominated by women. When I go to the park I’m treated like a shark swimming in a shallow pool. It’s REALLY hard to find other dads in the area. It’s very isolating…which is the number one complaint SAHDs have.


Whoever said that staying at home to look after children and the home was easy? Anyone who has experienced taking on the primary responsibility of caring for children knows it’s more than a full-time job. Handling school obligations and social schedules on top of the domestic responsibilities of managing a household is a workload that is never done, and I don’t know anyone who has successfully balanced both. Anyone who believes that SAHDs are lazy must never have been in in a stay-at-home position themselves.
For example, though telecommuting is technically a “stay-at-home” job, companies generally still expect their telecommuters to be available during regular business hours. The following are the best jobs for stay at home moms (and dads!) available, which allow parents to actually spend time with their kids and generate enough income so they don't have to take in a boarder:
Hi Patrick, thanks for the comment. You can start by looking in to some opportunities listed on this post. Then, you may want to set up a professional website for yourself to market your services. If you have experience in a particular field, you can start yourself to potential clients. If you don’t have any experience, you may want to do a few jobs for free to build up enough experience to improve your chances of getting hired. Good luck!
Mark Bildner, who serves as host this day, is a veteran of the local D.C. Metro dads' network. He's raising four kids; the eldest is 10. Bildner says he finds that men often have trouble breaking out of the work mindset and getting into the world of parenting. At work, he explains, projects tend to be linear — the goal is to finish one task and move forward to the next, then hit the next goal, the next milestone.
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