Another drag of the work-at-home mom daily grind, is social and professional isolation. For an introvert like me, I think, I could care less about interacting with humans face-to-face all day. The less humans, the better. However, I know the corporate dance. I used to do it. There is a certain amount of small talk that goes a long way towards staying in good standing with management and securing one’s future. I also know how humans work — we all feed off of some level of engagement and connection with one another. If we didn’t, we wouldn’t live in communities or ever get lonely. 
Mark Bildner, who serves as host this day, is a veteran of the local D.C. Metro dads' network. He's raising four kids; the eldest is 10. Bildner says he finds that men often have trouble breaking out of the work mindset and getting into the world of parenting. At work, he explains, projects tend to be linear — the goal is to finish one task and move forward to the next, then hit the next goal, the next milestone.
Hi. I am a 35 year old woman with extreme social phobia and anxiety. I have been working forever as a retail manager. I have great customer service skills and can type fairly well. I have been on short term disability for almost a year and it is going to be ending. I have no idea what I’m going to do, or how I will be able to pay my bills. I need a way to support myself by working at home without any of the scams or gimmicks. If there is anyone out there that could help me or knows of something, PLEASE let me know.
But there is one scenario that these numbers cannot possibly reflect — the number of moms who have successfully launched part-time businesses or side hustles out of their homes. Although there is no hard data on those numbers, more than 8.6 million U.S. businesses are owned by women. Undoubtedly, many of those businesses are run by mothers who manage their businesses’ affairs while also keeping an eye on the kids.
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