It used to be the recent college grads would pack a bag shortly after graduation and go abroad to teach English. The pay wasn’t much, but the international experience was well worth the low wages. Thanks to high-speed internet and countries packed with both kids and upwardly mobile business executives eager to learn English, now you can teach it without leaving the comfort of your living room. And while many of the listings would prefer teaching experience and/or a TOESL (Teaching of English as a Second Language) certification, it’s often not required. Most positions are part-time with flexible schedules based on what time zone the students are in (classes generally don’t run longer than 60 minutes), allow you to take on as much work as you’d like, and pay upwards of $25 an hour.

When Deeanne Akerson launched Kindred Bravely, the maternity and breastfeeding apparel line, she was a stay-at-home mother of two small children working out of her guest bedroom and running a business on her own. A year into running the start-up she needed to hire her first employee, a part-time customer service representative. Her hire was a mother of three who wanted to work flexible hours to take care of her family.

Once upon a time, customer service representatives worked in massive call centers in the middle of the Arizona desert ⏤ or overseas. And while many still do, times have changed. Today there are almost 2.75 million reps handling complaints, processing orders, a providing product information around the country and, not only is the number growing, but many are now working from home. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, over 500,000 customer service reps work part-time. While hardly glamorous, and often requiring you to interact with crappy people on the other end of the line, the positions are often entry-level, provide training, and come with steady hours. The biggest drawback is that a lot of customer service reps work on a full-time shift schedule, so while you will be home, you could be tied down.
World War II had a significant impact on changing family roles. Because of the draft, workers were scarce in many industries and employers began to fill jobs with women, mainly in nontraditional positions. This increase in working women became one of the few times in history where women were praised for work outside the home.[12] Divorce rates also reached a new high during this period. Not only had many women found a new sense of independence, but cultural shifts were underway, including the rise of feminism and the development of reliable methods of birth control. Such changes caused some women to decide to end their unhappy marriages.[13]
Soon after the column appeared I got a call from the Boston ABC TV affiliate WCVB TV “The Boston Channel.”  They wanted to get a local angle on dads returning to work. One at-home dad, David Hubbard from Stow, MA had a particularly interesting story because his experience disclosing his at-home dad status on his resume yielded positive reactions instead of the negative results reported by the other dads. Dave is back at work at in the same position at the same company he left before he began his career break in 2004. He’s Director of Government Contracts for DSD Laboratories. Following is his “Relaunch Success Story"

CashCrate is an online platform where you can start earning money by completing offers, taking surveys, watching videos, and shopping online using their site. I’ve played around on the site a little bit, and you’ll want to make sure that you read all of the fine print on each and every offer. Many offers require an email address, which means you’ll receive offers from them and other marketers. Tasks pay out anywhere from a few cents to $30.00 or more, and you’ll receive $1 for signing up for an account. Payments are made via check or PayPal.
Jen notes that she is aware of the warning advice for breadwinning wives that the switch-up can lead to the path of divorce. “The man [feels] not needed as much or the woman feels too much pressure from every angle,” explains Jen. “It may be true, but I also think you both have to have the mindset of, ‘OK, this is what we are going to do. If it doesn’t work out, we’ll change it, but regardless, we’ll work it out together.’ ”
Teaching English online from home is a great way to make some extra money or bring in a full-time income. Currently, three companies that specialize in teaching English to Chinese children online are in the midst of a hiring push. Online teaching is flexible, and the pay is excellent. It's also rewarding to work with children. The three companies … Read More
That said, there’s good news: If you’re searching for a work-from-home job because you’re looking for the kind of flexibility you can’t get being tied to a desk for nine hours a day, you’re absolutely in luck. Working remotely, assuming your employer is okay with projects being done on your timeline, can be a godsend for parents. The arrangement allows you to work around daycare and preschool schedules, take kids to doctors appointments and soccer practice, and rarely if ever stress when they wake up with a fever and you need to stay home. Working from home can make life, especially if both parents are employed full time, infinitely easier.
From the time we’re very little, we’re all told the same thing, “You can be anything you want to be when you grow up!” So, we go to school for over 12 years—or more—with the hope of being a well-educated citizen of course, but also, with the aspiration of pinpointing and stepping into our dream career. That’s a lot of years! Eventually, or hopefully, if you’re lucky you finally find your passion and voila! You get to be anything you want to be, on and on until the end of time.
×