Going to work may be the way many women make a living, but if staying home to work sounds good to you, you're not alone: About 21 percent of employed adults did some or all of their job at home, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Considering becoming a work-at-home mom (WAHM) yourself? First, heed the advice of moms and experts who have learned the best ways to navigate life at the intersection of WAHM-ing and Mom-ing.


When Deeanne Akerson launched Kindred Bravely, the maternity and breastfeeding apparel line, she was a stay-at-home mother of two small children working out of her guest bedroom and running a business on her own. A year into running the start-up she needed to hire her first employee, a part-time customer service representative. Her hire was a mother of three who wanted to work flexible hours to take care of her family.
Many of us assume that in most marriages, the mother is the default partner who not only wants to stay home and raise kids, but is also the one who will take the least financial hit — in other words, women usually still make less money than men. But with all of the couples I interviewed, money was most definitely a factor — because the wives made significantly more money than their husbands.
You may think working at home means you can skip child care, but you'll have days when you need help -- and that's okay. When Jonas was about 6 months old, O'Donnell hired a responsible high-school student to watch him two or three hours two days a week. The teenager charged half of what an adult sitter or day care would, and it meant O'Donnell could concentrate on answering e-mails and returning phone calls.
From the time we’re very little, we’re all told the same thing, “You can be anything you want to be when you grow up!” So, we go to school for over 12 years—or more—with the hope of being a well-educated citizen of course, but also, with the aspiration of pinpointing and stepping into our dream career. That’s a lot of years! Eventually, or hopefully, if you’re lucky you finally find your passion and voila! You get to be anything you want to be, on and on until the end of time.
Still, many men struggle to find acceptance within the role of stay-at-home dad despite the many gains that have been made. Many worry about losing business skills and their "professional place in line".[19] There is a common misconception that stay-at-home dads cannot get a job and therefore must rewrite the typical family roles, forcing the wife into the workforce.[16] In the United Kingdom, some househusbands say their wives lost respect for them, divorced them, then won custody of the children.[21]
Alice’s Table empowers women to start their own flower arranging events businesses in their communities. Alice’s Table provides the ongoing training, and support women need to launch their businesses, and connects them to a community of hosts across the country. The Alice’s Table host program prioritizes living well and working hard — giving women the opportunity to create a career for themselves that is flexible and creative, while also challenging, sustainable and inspiring. With Alice’s Table, you take home 70% of ticket sales (before the cost of flowers) and can earn up to $600 per two-hour event (depending on the size of the event). Click here to apply and mention you saw us on The Work at Home Woman.
In general, he cooks, cleans and cares for his children most days of the week, while his partner works outside the home as the family’s main breadwinner. Because many at-home dads also provide some income to the family, whether by working an evening or weekend shift full-time, working part-time inside or outside the home, or doing odd jobs when it works into the family’s schedule, we believe that a man’s position as an “at-home dad” is best defined by his role as a caregiver, rather than by his employment or income status. We also find that most at-home dads are in the role by choice (over 70% according to this 2012 study), and not due to job loss or an inability to find employment.
https://www.chase.com/news/032918-stay-at-home-dads stay at home dad, working dads, working moms, dad returning to work, stay at home father, caretaker father, caretaker dad, dad working again, African American father playfully holds his daughter, laughing. African American father playfully holds his daughter, laughing. 03/26/18 African American father playfully holds his daughter, laughing.
For Laura, a chemist, and her husband, Ron, a former construction worker, the decision was somewhat mutual. “We had talked about it before we got married and knew that if it was financially possible, we wanted one person to stay home when we had children (both of us came from families where both parents worked),” explains Laura. “I wanted a career and we knew that I would be able to make more money than he could, and he liked the idea of taking care of the kids.”

For Laura, a chemist, and her husband, Ron, a former construction worker, the decision was somewhat mutual. “We had talked about it before we got married and knew that if it was financially possible, we wanted one person to stay home when we had children (both of us came from families where both parents worked),” explains Laura. “I wanted a career and we knew that I would be able to make more money than he could, and he liked the idea of taking care of the kids.”
I have two small children and found going to a workplace full time was incredibly difficult alongside meeting the children’s needs (and paying for childcare!). It was very scary leaving a place of security and heading towards the unknown of being self-employed and working from home. I believed in myself and took the plunge to teach online for an established company. It was the best decision. The job is fun and energising and I fit it when my kids are at school. My children are happy and calm and I’m not worried about finances.
Shots is the online channel for health stories from the NPR Science Desk. We report on news that can make a difference for your health and show how policy shapes our health choices. Look to Shots for the latest on research and medical treatments, as well as the business side of health. Your hosts are Scott Hensley and Carmel Wroth. You can reach the Shots team via our contact form.
There is no clear data on the number of stay-at-home dads because the Census Bureau doesn’t define that category. The most recent data can be found from a Pew Research report in 2013, which found that “2 million U.S. fathers with children in their household were not working outside the home…”  The data assumes that these Dads were caregiving for the kids.
×