13.  Weekends are for family.  Okay, if there’s a project you can work on together (especially if you have older kids), then go for it.  But if you’ll spend the whole time frustrated that the kids are about to shoot you with the nail gun (like I would), then forget about it and hang with them.  Or–do what you all can and then move on to their choice.
Furthermore, the cost of daycare often sets families up for needing two incomes. Working full-time puts immense pressure on one’s time and makes it tempting to get on the paying-for-services train: take-out, house cleaners, laundry services, dog-walkers, someone to mow your lawn, and every other conceivable time-saving expense. And paying for all of this, plus daycare, makes us ever-more dependent on our paychecks. While it’s worth it if both parents dearly want or need to work full-time, it’s nevertheless a rude awakening of what we pay for the privilege of working.
This is a very impressive and informative list. I have always looked up to women bloggers who manages to enjoy their time being a mother at home while fulfilling a passion and creating a successful career even at home. This is why I have decided to get more details via CompareBroadband when it comes to internet services to be able to fulfill my dreams of becoming a WAHM as well. I love to express myself and blog at the same time. Hopefully I can contribute something significant to the online world while generating income as well.
Elna Cain is known for her ability to run a freelance writing business while caring for twins. She started her blog called TwinsMommy which teaches moms to be mompreneurs. She started by sharing her journey every step of the way from month one of starting her blog to where she is at now. The process includes page views, email subscribers, goals, and such.
Great post Carly! I am in the same boat without as you with going back to work after having a baby. My husband and I decided it’s best that I stay home. I am blogging as well and hope to contribute to my family financially as well. ITs so nice to hear of someone’s success blogging so close to home (I’m from Saskatchewan) it gives me the fire to keep keep going!
Fast-forward 15 years, and I’ve had at least seven work-from-home jobs, usually more than one at time. It’s been great for the most part. I do get the best of all worlds — getting to make my own schedule, being able to be with my kids during the day, keeping my foot in the door professionally, and contributing to the household income. I feel incredibly fortunate to have been able to find work I can do from home all these years.
Filmless is seeking home-based freelance voice over artists. This freelance opportunity can be performed from anywhere in the world with Internet access. You will be recording from your own home studio. From the company: "We're looking for the best voice talent to help us record professional voice overs for clients ranging in size from startups to Fortune … Read More
I too decided that, once my children started arriving, I would never work full-time while they were still young if I could possibly avoid it, and I too am a feminist. I mean, I like that I get to vote, inherit property and am allowed to have my own bank account, what’s not to like, am I right? (This is what I say to women who do that stupid thing of going ”oohhh I’m not a FEMINIST…” as though it means a hideous man-hating harpy who burns her undergarments and refuses to shave her ‘tache). This time, and it is short, believe me, will never come back. And babies under 18 months at the very earliest, are not really candidates for ”socialisation” in any true, meaningful way as you’d get at a daycare. Sure, mom-and-me classes are great, but the notion of ”playing together” and ”collaborative / sharing” stuff happens closer to 3 in reality, so I promise your little cherub is completely happy and satisfied in what is to her a brand-new, totally exciting world with new stuff every, single day, anchored by familiar, loving faces and a structure to feel safe in. This is not a rant against daycare as that too provides a loving and warm environment in which young babies and kids can explore safely etcetera. But fear not re socialisation. Get her into a couple-of-times-per-week play school some time between 2.5-3 and otherwise just do the usual things you’d want to do anyway, like water-orientation classes, mom and tot activity groups, that kind of thing.

Your reasons sound a lot like mine for staying at home. I quit after my second, largely because after daycare I would be bringing home $200 a month. I figured I could save that much by being home and not having to outsource things like cleaning/cooking/baking, etc. I worked from home for a few months, then was done. Now I do a little free lance writing when I have time, but it’s a bit harder now they aren’t babies who nap a bunch!
I’m a former lawyer turned entrepreneur with Rodan+Fields (makers of ProActiv, the acne system). After welcoming my twin girls, I decided traveling, long hours, and dial-ins were no longer for me. I wanted to work from home on a part-time basis and Rodan+Fields has allowed me to do that. If you’re interested in earning a solid part-time income on your own terms, I’d love to talk to you!
‘PalFish is a leading English education platform in China who makes quality English education simple for both teachers and students. Its PalFish Official Kids Course, for students between 3-15 years old, is expanding with a fast speed and more teachers are needed! And some teachers can even earn over $200 in a day by teaching from home! If you are looking for an online ESL job, give it a try and you won’t regret.

It is extremely important for mothers to find a balance between work and home. When you find a legit stay at home position, it may become even harder to find that balance because of the comfort of being home some of us may not be able to take work as serious not being in a work environment. My advice as a stay at home mom is to remember what and who you are doing this for. what is your motivation? my motivation is my daughter. she keeps me going and i will never give up knowing that she is counting on me. I wish every single one of you the best!


The FlexJobs database lists thousands of work-at-home jobs that offer stay-at-home moms the ability to work comfortably from a home office. And according to the FlexJobs survey of working parents in 2017, the ability to work flexibly is one of the top contributors to a healthy work-life balance. Below we’ve got 10 great work-at-home jobs for stay-at-home moms, along with their median annual salary from PayScale.
I’ve been a work at home mom—in some capacity—since my first son was born in 2010. When he was seven months old, I returned to my day job, working part-time. I was directing a business development team for a non-profit and—despite the boundaries I had tried to set by reeling back my schedule—people never had a problem calling me on my days off or afterhours. I couldn’t just “shut off,” so I was inevitably the mother pushing my son on the swing with a phone at my ear.
Errand service provider—There are a lot of people who need assistance with running errands. They include seniors, people with limited mobility, corporate executives, and working parents. You could do anything from grabbing some groceries to picking up some dry cleaning. You would likely take your kids with you, and you may even be able to get some of your own errands completed at the same time. Most people charge by the errand, and you could earn the equivalent of $20.00 an hour or more. 

We are lucky in that my mom, a single woman, wanted to retire and move in with us to raise our son before he goes to preschool (We also get along well with my mom). We will probably put our son in part time daycare when he’s a year old or 18 months, like 2-3 days a week) as at that point, it drops in price and I do want him to socialize with other kiddos (I’m a bit of a homebody so myself alone wouldn’t be good at finding playdates). We’re cloth diapering and I’ve heard anecdotally that that can make potty training “easier” with elimination communication, so I’m hoping getting potty trained faster (if we’re successful) will make cheaper daycare an earlier possibility for us as well.
What Ive seen over the years is that my friends who quit working entirely did not go back to work unless they couldnt survive without the income. This was due to a combination of reasons: it wasn’t easy to get back in and they had to start at the bottom; they and their families had grown used to have a parent always available and it was now hard to imagine not having that. This meant that the new job had to be high-paying and flexible in order to be worth it and this is rarely offered to someone who’s been out of the job market for a while unless she has a rare, in-demand skilll.
As I mentioned, now that I’m down to 2 hours of work time during the day, I’ve instituted a new system of early work hours. 3 days a week I wake up at 4:45, roll out of bed and head to Starbucks for a 2 hour work session. So far, so good. Although I don’t enjoy getting out of bed that early, it feels amazing to start the day on top of my inbox and ahead of the game rather than watching work pile up until nap time. My stress levels are down, my productivity is up and my after-dinner hours are now open to connect with my husband. You may not feel you need to leave the house but I do. It keeps me focused and since my daughter is still breastfeeding I can’t be in the house if she wakes up and expect to continue working.
If you don't learn to keep your roles as mom and businesswoman separate, giving each your full concentration for a set amount of time, you'll never feel like you're doing either well. To separate mentally from the rest of the house, set up a private office area, recommends Lauren Kohl, an attorney and mom of two in Newton, Massachusetts. She works out of a converted closet, a kid-free zone that helps her to detach from the rest of her house. If she can't see the dirty rompers in the hamper, she's less inclined to leave her desk to launder them, she says. Plus, it helps you disengage from your job if you have a door to close. If you don't have an office, try making a list of everything you're going to do the next day, leave it in your work space, and walk away. "You're doing something to turn work off," says Durst.
2. Think about how much time you want to devote to a work-at-home job. There are part-time and full-time telecommuting jobs out there, offering anywhere from five to 40+ hours per week. As a mom, your schedule is probably based on your kids' and childcare schedules, so it's important to think about how a job can fit with that too. How often do you want to work, or how much time do you actually have to give to a job? What hours are you available to work? Weekdays? Weekends? There are definitely telecommuting jobs to fit all sorts of schedules (and flexible schedule jobs too!), but if you know what you want/need ahead of time, it makes your search much easier and sets you up for long-term success.

Great list Whitney! Another great option is Amazon FBA (Fulfillment By Amazon) There are apps (like Profit Bandit) that will allow you to scan the barcodes of clearance items at local stores and know instantly if the item can be sold for a profit on Amazon. The beauty of FBA is you simply ship all of the items at once to Amazon and they handle picking, packing and shipping your items when they sell so you can get back to being a mom 🙂 I know three people that make a legitimate six-figure income doing this from home.

Online reseller—Moms who are savvy at picking out good deals can often earn money by starting online resale businesses. It could be a great way for you to create your own online job. It can be as simple as buying items at a discount and then reselling them on websites like Amazon or eBay. Just make sure that you are adhering to tax laws and properly reporting your income.
Rover.com, a nationwide network that connects dog owners with local dog sitters, is seeking professional dog sitters, casual dog lovers - anyone who wants to earn a side income dog sitting. The company's dog sitters can earn up to $50.00 per dog, per day. From the company: "Snuggle dogs. Get paid. Live the dream. A service is booked on Rover every minute of … Read More
Thanks so much for this great article. I’ve been trying to get a graphic design business but am having trouble finding business. I’d also love to blog but don’t know where to start. There are so many amazing blogs out there that it’s hard to think I could have anything new to contribute. But my son is 6 months now and it seems like a perfect time to get started…thanks for the ideas and encouragement!

For previous experience, a lot of fantastic options don’t require you to have any. If the job does, don’t rule it out yet, get creative. Find ways for your background to reflect some of those skills and highlight why your background makes you an excellent candidate. You can also always volunteer to do some free work, which is a common way to enter a field like photography.
The web abounds with information for people who want to sell their services online (coaching, consulting, writing, etc), but what if you want to sell actual products — and still be location-independent? Turn to Tropical MBA, where Dan Andrews and Ian Schoen share the strategies they used to build a multi-million dollar business. Even better, give their weekly podcast a listen — it covers a range of topics every aspiring entrepreneur should know about.
1. Envelope stuffing—You are asked to send in money to receive a starter kit and told that you will be paid for every envelope that you stuff and send. What you end up receiving is a package telling you how to advertise the scam. The goal is that you advertise the same envelope-stuffing scheme to others and allegedly get a kickback for every person who responds to your ads and signs up.
It may sound less glamorous than some of the aforementioned job opportunities, but it’s such an important and impactful role. If you’re already the primary caregiver to children, this type of role may or may not be the right fit, as constant caregiving can be a major drain (just ask a stay-at-home mom or stay-at-home dad). That said, this line of work, which could either be a full- or part-time job, comes with plenty of job security — there will always be elderly people who need caring for, and someone to brighten their day. Look to in-home senior care if you want to have the relative flexibility of a stay at home job while also making a difference.
Many moms find that it helps to put their short-term and long-term goals into writing. That way you can periodically check back to make sure that your efforts are directed toward your long-term goals. It’s also important to allow some room for flexibility. If you find out that you can’t manage the time commitment, for example, or if you suddenly find yourself without a babysitter, you’ll need to be able to modify your plans.
Wow; only $700 – that really puts things into perspective! It feels much more approachable/attainable when you look at it that way! I actually have my fingers in a number of pies, as well – besides Amazon publishing and direct sales, I also bring in a little here and there through blogging (‘though that’s far from dependable), and I sell some of my photos through stock sites. (That REALLY doesn’t bring in a lot, but if the pictures are just sitting on my hard drive anyway, I might as well put them somewhere they can bring in a few cents.)
I can’t NOT work; that one month of bed rest drove me crazy and I’d be bored without something to engage my mind. I do copy writing, editing and transcription. My first clients were referrals from friends and online communities. I now have enough projects to pay the bills for the next few months, especially since we made a drastically leaner budget that allows me to stay at home. My husband’s office offers health insurance for dependents, so that’s one less thing to pay for. The WAHM life can be quite exhausting and since I’m extroverted, I find it lonely sometimes. But the plus is priceless: I get to spend my days with my two most favorite people in the world.

We are lucky in that my mom, a single woman, wanted to retire and move in with us to raise our son before he goes to preschool (We also get along well with my mom). We will probably put our son in part time daycare when he’s a year old or 18 months, like 2-3 days a week) as at that point, it drops in price and I do want him to socialize with other kiddos (I’m a bit of a homebody so myself alone wouldn’t be good at finding playdates). We’re cloth diapering and I’ve heard anecdotally that that can make potty training “easier” with elimination communication, so I’m hoping getting potty trained faster (if we’re successful) will make cheaper daycare an earlier possibility for us as well.


This is such a great blog! My name is Susan Kirt and I am also with Rodan and Fields. I have been with this company for 5 years and I work it alongside my full time teaching position in Farragut. I have to tell you that this is a LEGIT company! I started, not wanting to sell a thing, but I love presenting information to people- good information ( that’s the teacher in me). Fast forward 5 years and this business has allowed me to stay home with my little boys for two years, before they started school. I spent MAYBE 10 hours a week building my business ( no inventory) around the nooks and crannies of my day. Now I work this side gig to help pay for family vacations, monthly bills and any unexpected turns life throws at us.
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