It sounds obvious, but I've definitely been in the situation in which I'm deep "in the zone" and my kids are craving my attention. I've found that when I dedicate a set period of time to them, whether it's reading, drawing, walking the dog together or just having a chat, they're then cool with amusing themselves when I go back to work for an hour or so.  
Great post! For me, I work in a virtual environment. I design clothing on Photoshop, then I upload them to virtual games and sell them to people in the games for money. I usually work 2 to 5 hrs a week and make $300 to $500 a month. It’s just a bit of extra spending money as we have survived for years on one income but it’s nice to have the little extra coming in.
I am a working mother. I am blessed to have my mom care for my children. I do pay her but she is very affordable. It works well for us since I make more money at my job and I have excellent benefits as well. My mom is able to earn some money and she has a great relationship with my girls. If I didn’t have family to care for my kids, then my husband would be the one to stay home.
The challenges of WAHM-hood are plentiful, but the real struggle lies in the emotional labor of trying to simultaneously ensure that you’re fulfilling the duties of being a good parent while showing employers you can handle their workload and meet expectations—all on little sleep and an unpredictable schedule. You are nanny, mommy, and employee—at the same exact time. It’s a constant tug-of-war.
I’m a homeschooling mom with one still in the homeschool nest (14) and one commuting as a sophomore in college. I have been a freelance proofreader for university presses since 1994; I teach World and Comparative Lit at a homeschool co-op; and began a Plexus business for weight loss in January of this year for only $34.95 (I’ve lost 16.5 pounds and feel better than I have in years!).  Jenni Rom at Plexus

I’m resonating with every single part of this post. I’m so thankful to be staying home full-time with our two after the school year ends, and every one of the emotions you discussed were part of that decision. I hope to eventually earn freelance income through proofreading and writing as well! Congratulations again, and thank you for sharing your decision process here.
We make and sell natural products, including magnesium lotion, herbal salves, lotion bars, herbal bath salts and we’ll soon be adding spice mixes and teas! Justyn at Real Traditions and Creative Christian Mama (A note from Shannon: The magnesium lotion is the first “natural deodorant” I’ve used that actually works! Plus, it helps me (and my kids) fall asleep when we’re having a restless night. It rocks!)

Babywoods has the cutest little smile! I quit working when my kids were little to stay home with them for five years until my youngest started kindergarten. I did side hustles from home for extra money. Since they started school, I’ve worked part time, then full time and now I’m back to part time. My oldest graduates high school next month and my youngest will be gone in two years. It is so true that the time passes so, so quickly. Even though there were times that were difficult when I stayed home, I’m so, so glad I did. My advice (even though you didn’t ask for it. 🙂 ) is to remember that it is every bit as important for you to get out and socialize as it is for Babywoods when you stay home. The public library was always a good place for us as they would have story hour and other activities for the kids and the moms could talk at the same time. I made some great friends that way. You could also see if there are any Meetup groups for moms and kids in your area.


Awesome Hannah! I really felt like 6 months was the magic number with both of mine too, where we started getting back into a routine. I was just thinking about this today, and I really feel like there’s room for any blogger who is willing to be brave and share their unique perspective and story. You’re the only you! So don’t be intimidated by how many others there are. If you do decide to start one, feel free to email me! I’d love to answer any questions you might have. Have you thought about doing something with your graphic design on Fiverr? Or perhaps contact bloggers, as they often need help making nice Pinnable images.
Thanks for this post! I was curious how it all played out. We struggled with what to do as we live incredibly rural and day care was not an option (nor was a full/part time nanny or babysitter)- heck I commute 90 miles one way for work and to put the little guy in daycare would have been another 20 miles one way. My husband works for the family ranch and I love my job with the park service. As soon as we found out I was pregnant, we started brainstorming options and resources. We crunched the numbers and realized we could make it on my husband’s salary (quitting his job wasn’t really an option). But I really love my work and the intellectual stimulation it gives me, so wasn’t keen on giving up that all together. We got creative and decided to pitch a solution that ended up, to our surprise and delight, being accepted by both employers. Now I go to the office 2 days a week, and work from home 1/2 a day with additional hours throughout the week as I can manage; I usually end up with about 20-25 hours/week. On my office days and telework mornings, DH is primary care giver and only participates in work that he can take the little guy along with. This arrangement has really worked well for us and has given us the added benefit of DH have “father-son” days that have really helped our transition from a couple to a family. It’s not without it’s challenges. I am a year out from finishing a graduate degree and so am also sacrificing sleep to finish schoolwork on evenings and weekends. I am getting a new supervisor at work that may not be as receptive to either a part time or teleworking employee (both uncommon at my unit) and could require me to return to full time on-site work or give my notice. We’ve also had some push-back from my husband’s family about his availability to do various activities. We try to maintain open communication and conversation about what’s working and what isn’t with each other and with our respective employers. So far (little guy is 8 months), so good but we continue to plan and strategize for the future, while enjoying the time we both have with our little guy. Everyday brings new joys and challenges and we continue to take them one at a time.
4. Seek the support of fellow working moms. Talk regularly with other moms who have gone back to work about their experiences and challenges, both practical and emotional. Going back to work is a common choice, but that doesn’t mean that it’s easy and that you won’t feel occasional heartache to be away from your kids (you will!). But there is safety and support in numbers, and speaking to people who have been where you’re about to go will be extremely helpful in plotting your own return to the working world.

2. Email processing—Like envelope stuffing, you are not processing emails at all. You pay a starter fee in order to get information about how to set up a web page. You can pay an additional fee to have the company set up a web page for you. Then you are required to start running (and paying for) the same online ads that attracted you. Every time someone clicks on one and signs up, you are supposed to receive a commission.
Real Ways to Earn Money is a large resource of home-based jobs. There is a huge directory of work from home opportunities, tons of ways to earn extra cash, and enough job leads to keep you busy applying for weeks! This does not even take into consideration the several weekly updates of valuable blog posts Anna posts each and every week. Whether you want to be a freelance writer, track down non-phone jobs, or just earn a little extra each month, you can find it all (and more!) on Real Ways to Earn!
For many women, like me, who need both the income and the outlet, working part time is a blessed answer. I’m thankful that today loads of mothers are making strides in both the public and the private sectors from the comfort of their own couches. I’m glad I get to be one of them because the work-at-home-mom (otherwise known as WAHM) community is an excellent one. It seems that the tides are turning and the battle cry of the mommy wars are quieting; thanks to a new climate—a new way of leaning in, if you will—we seem to be coming together as a community of women, supporting each other in our choices to raise kids, explore creative endeavors, start businesses, and find ourselves in a whole new way.
When our first was born (almost 3 years ago), I went back to work full time and my husband stayed home. Then my husband went to work full time and I worked from home part time when our son was a year. Most recently, when we had our second in January, we decided for me to stay home full time because two in daycare would have totally wiped out any income I brought in. Sigh. I love being home with my babies but I also look forward to when they go to school and I can return to work. The part about socialization for kiddos is equally true for the stay at home parent. It’s so important to make play dates and activities so you get to see other people (real people too even though we can talk to people online). This has been especially hard with two and in the MN winter but so important for my sanity and ability to parent well!
AirTreks is a travel agency that offers international and multi-stop tickets for travel. AirTreks provides training, but requires prospective employees to have traveled to five or more countries. AirTreks Travel Agents use Amadeus GDS. Job Search Tip: Work-from-home Travel Agent positions are often listed as “Travel Planner”. Starting pay is $2,000+commission.

My husband and I were builders in the military. Now, I’m a stay-at-home mom and he goes to school full-time, so our budget is extremely tight. It’s even tighter with hundreds of dollars going towards debt each month. We decided to use our construction experience to renovate and sell our home for a profit. We plan to use the money to pay off most, if not all, our debt. The next house should make enough money for us to pay ourselves a monthly salary while we work on the house after that and so on. This will be our “job,” so we get to work at home and create our own schedule as a family.

Great post Carly! I am in the same boat without as you with going back to work after having a baby. My husband and I decided it’s best that I stay home. I am blogging as well and hope to contribute to my family financially as well. ITs so nice to hear of someone’s success blogging so close to home (I’m from Saskatchewan) it gives me the fire to keep keep going!
When I was pregnant 16 years ago with our first daughter I had a conversation with my Grandma a few weeks before she went to be with the Lord. I told her there is NO way I could stay home…it’s just not possible on one income. Well, it was possible and the Lord provided a way for me to transition from working at the physical therapy office I was employed with and had done some transcription for by putting me in contact with a local transcription company ran by a husband and wife. I typed for about the first 4 years of her life and then we found that we could indeed live on one income if we prioritized and ran our household differently. And avoided unnecessary items that today’s society in general think are priorities. It has been a wonderful 16 years with my two daughters. I began homeschooling them, too, eight years ago! It’s wonderful and now I don’t have to work at all. When they were small I would buy high end clothing for them and re-sell it to make it a near wash when the clothes were outgrown. Now we enjoy thrift storing almost exclusively and those clothes we don’t ant any longer or don’t fit we sell at consignment shops to make back some money. I regularly go through my house, too, and get rid of things that aren’t being used and sell them on facebook or my areas local selling page. It helps to make back a little!
When considering the type of job you want, be sure to factor in your financial requirements, how many hours you want to work (be it full-time work or part-time), your child care accommodations, and whether you need health insurance or other benefits. For moms and dads, there are definite perks to working from home, in that you have better flexibility to care for your family. But this flexibility can also come at a cost — make sure you understand the pluses as well as the minuses. A few of the standouts are as follows:
I did not want to be stuck at home all day with no car to get out and experience our city with my daughter. And I most definitely did not want to wake up, get my daughter in the car, drive 45 minutes one way just to drop my husband off at work to drive home hang out a couple of hours and then pack back up the car with my daughter to drive 45 minutes one way to pick him back up and then drive 45 more minutes home (but probably more like an hour because of traffic… thanks I35).
10.  Set a date night.  Every week.  Every other at the least.  (P.S. This totally applies to all married folk.)  Between being a mom, chauffeur, housekeeper, diaper changer, meal planner, etc.  and running your own business (all by your lonesome), there is little time for your love life.  Make the time–no excuses.  Your husband will worship you for it–and you’ll be so thankful he does.  There’s really nothing better on this earth than to find your partner, the one who finishes your sentences.  Treasure that relationship.
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